Unmade in America | MIT Technology Review

Estelle Sidler

In July, St. Louis was still scrambling to raise $500,000 to buy machinery that would allow him to test the fabric used in masks. Meanwhile, he refers inquiries about mask testing to a company in Nevada—the lone private laboratory in the US certified by the CDC to perform such tests.

Meanwhile, 40 miles south of Conover, in the town of Belmont, the Textile Technology Center at Gaston College specializes in what the industry refers to as “yarn.” Give Dan Rhodes a small sample of a novel polymer, and he’ll figure out how to extrude it into a filament, and how to fine-tune the process to see whether the material can be made to work in high-speed manufacturing. Rhodes and his colleagues are working with a manufacturer of coronavirus test kits to make the fiber wicks that siphon saliva samples into a blend of testing reagents. Another client is an Ohio-based

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Giant robotic scorpion could be the ultimate gaming computer rig

Estelle Sidler



a person sitting on a chair: MailOnline logo


© Provided by Daily Mail
MailOnline logo

It may look and move like a scorpion, but this $3,999 chair is the ultimate gaming and work station.

A US firm unveiled the Scorpion Computer Cockpit that is powered with a push of a button, allowing the user to transform the design to fit their needs.

The ‘tail’ moves from the back of the chair overhead to become a screen mount that holds up to three displays and owners can choose to sit upright or lie down to take a break.

Stretching nearly five and a half feet long, it is also equipped with a massage and heating feature so ‘can enjoy some quality time while you’re making yourself look like the ultimate villain.’

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a person sitting on a chair in front of a curtain: It may look and move like a scorpion, but this $3,999 chair is the ultimate gaming or work station. A US firm unveiled the Scorpion Computer Cockpit that is powered with a push of a button, allowing the user to transform the design to fit their needs


© Provided by Daily Mail
It may look and move like a scorpion, but this $3,999 chair is the ultimate gaming or work station.

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Buy Or Sell: Steelers Will Use Ray-Ray McCloud As Gadget Player

Estelle Sidler

The offseason is inevitably a period of projection and speculation, which makes it the ideal time to ponder the hypotheticals that the Pittsburgh Steelers will face over the course of the next year, whether it is addressing free agency, the draft, performance on the field, or some more ephemeral topic.

That is what I will look to address in our Buy or Sell series. In each installment, I will introduce a topic statement and weigh some of the arguments for either buying it (meaning that you agree with it or expect it to be true) or selling it (meaning you disagree with it or expect it to be false).

The range of topics will be intentionally wide, from the general to the specific, from the immediate to that in the far future. And as we all tend to have an opinion on just about everything, I invite you to share

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The 2020 Browser Battle: Surfing With Speed

Estelle Sidler

Accessing the internet is one of the most basic tasks for any computer, but webpages in 2020 are incredibly complex so how the browser interprets the code and renders it as a viewable webpage is no simple task. Modern browsers have both a rendering or layout engine, as well as a scripting engine, and both factor into how well the browser can handle any particular task.

When the web first evolved, it was more or less a static affair, with webpages laid out in HyperText Markup Language, otherwise known as HTML, but as time passed websites became more and more complex, with it not uncommon today to run applications that would have been compiled programs several years ago. As such, browser performance is still an especially important metric for any PC user.

For 2020, the browser landscape has been shaken again, with Microsoft abandoning their closed source browser and moving

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